Category Archives: Thai Massage Scientific Research

Immediate Effects of Traditional Thai Massage on Psychological Stress as Indicated by Salivary Alpha-Amylase Levels in Healthy Persons.

Med Sci Monit Basic Res. 2015 Oct 5;21:216-21. doi: 10.12659/MSMBR.894343.

Immediate Effects of Traditional Thai Massage on Psychological Stress as Indicated by Salivary Alpha-Amylase Levels in Healthy Persons.

Abstract

BACKGROUND Stress can cause psychological and physiological changes. Many studies revealed that massage can decrease stress. However, traditional Thai massage has not been well researched in this regard. The purpose of this study was to investigate the immediate effects of traditional Thai massage (TTM) on salivary alpha-amylase levels (sAA), heart rate variability (HRV), autonomic nervous system (ANS) function, and plasma renin activity (PRA). MATERIAL AND METHODS Twenty-nine healthy participants were randomly allocated into either a traditional Thai massage (TTM) group or Control (C) group, after which they were switched to the other group with a 2-week wash-out period. Each of them was given a 10-minute mental arithmetic test to induce psychological stress before a 1-hour session of TTM or rest. RESULTS Within-groups comparison revealed that sAA was significantly decreased (p<0.05) in the TTM group but not in the C group. HRV and ANS function were significantly increased (p<0.05) and PRA was significantly decreased (p<0.05) in both groups. However, low frequency per high frequency ratio (LF/HF ratio) and ANS balance status were not changed. Only sAA was found to be significantly different between groups (p<0.05). CONCLUSIONS We conclude that both TTM and rest can reduce psychological stress, as indicated by decreased sAA levels, increased parasympathetic activity, decreased sympathetic activity, and decreased PRA. However, TTM may have a modest effect on stress reduction as indicated by a reduced sAA.

PMID:
26436433 [PubMed – in process] PMCID: PMC4599180 Free PMC Article

[PubMed]

PMID:
25682523 [PubMed – in process]
PubMed® is the premiere database for scientific and medical research, and is a service of the US National Library of Medicine and National Institutes of Health. As NIH: NLM Licensed providers, we syndicate publicly available abstracts from PubMed that are relevant to our readers. For full text, subscription to PubMed® is required.

Thai Yoga Therapy Role in Cancer Palliative Care Part 3

Thai Yoga Therapy Role in Cancer Palliation

By Anthony B. James DNM(P), ND(T), MD(AM), DPHC(h.c.), PhD, DOM, RAC, SMOKH Academic Dean SomaVeda College of Natural Medicine and Thai Yoga Center (SCNM).

General Benefits of Integrative Indigenous and Traditional Therapies Treatment adjuncts:

(Clinically researched i.e. validated in clinical trials and traditional anecdotal and benefits)

Continue reading Thai Yoga Therapy Role in Cancer Palliative Care Part 3

Thai Yoga Therapy Role in Cancer Palliative Care Part 2

Thai Yoga Therapy Role in Cancer Palliation

By Anthony B. James DNM(P), ND(T), MD(AM), DPHC(h.c.), DOM, RAC, SMOKH Academic Dean SomaVeda College of Natural Medicine and Thai Yoga Center (SCNM).

Traditional/ Classical Thai Yoga/ Thai Massage contains the following areas of emphasis and therapeutic modalities:

1) Sophisticated and refined Manual/ Physio/ Body-centric Hands-on interventions:

Thai Yoga Therapy incorporates elements of energetic (unseen energy: magnetic, electric, sonic etc.) and prana assessment, mindfulness, gentle rocking, asana (positional/ postural), structural release, deep stretching, focused deep breathing or prana yama, chakra balancing (Pyscho-emotional, Somatic and proprioceptive emphasis), Prana Nadi or Sen line balancing (Lines of stress, trans-subcutaneous muscle channels, fascia and connective tissue planes and or lymphatic pathways) and rhythmic compression with either broad, deep, non specific tools such as palm, foot, elbow and knee to emphasize with either specific point ( area of high neurologic potential) or broad trans- subcutaneous muscular or fascial plane to create a singular healing experience.

Continue reading Thai Yoga Therapy Role in Cancer Palliative Care Part 2

Thai Yoga Therapy for Cancer

Thai Yoga Therapy Role in Cancer Palliation

By Anthony B. James DNM(P), ND(T), MD(AM), DPHC(h.c.), PhD, DOM, RAC, SMOKH Academic Dean SomaVeda College of Natural Medicine and Thai Yoga Center (SCNM).

Title: Indigenous, Traditional Medicinal Therapies as Cancer Complication Remediation and Palliative Support for Cachexia.

What is Cachexia?

Cachexia; from Greek κακός kakos “bad” and ἕξις hexis “condition”)[1] or wasting syndrome is loss of weight, muscle atrophy, fatigue, weakness, and significant loss of appetite in someone who is not actively trying to lose weight. Cachexia is also known or seen in patients with cancer, AIDS,[2] chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, multiple sclerosis, congestive heart failure, tuberculosis, familial amyloid polyneuropathy, malaria, mercury poisoning (acrodynia) and hormonal deficiency. It is a positive risk factor for death, meaning if the patient has cachexia, the chance of death from the underlying condition is increased dramatically. About 50% of all cancer patients suffer from cachexia.

Mechanism

The exact mechanism in which these diseases cause cachexia is poorly understood and may vary from one individual to another, but there is probably a role for inflammatory cytokines, such as tumor necrosis factor-alpha (which is also nicknamed ‘cachexin’ or ‘cachectin’), interferon gamma and interleukin 6, as well as the tumor-secreted proteolysis-inducing factor. Side effects of chemotherapy drug regimen and or radiation therapy may be causes. Categories of physical/ biological adverse and or side effects of conventional Cancer therapies: include Edema, Inflammation, Neuropathies and Neuralgias, Immune suppression. Severe, possibly long term chronic malnutrition may be a factor.

Management:

1) Can Indigenous and traditional, native medicine practices and or evolving therapies derived from Indigenous culture traditions make a positive contribution towards Cancer complication remediation and palliative care?

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Thai Yoga at World Congress Natural Medicines

Thai Yoga at World Congress on Natural Medicines

Press Release:

Thai Yoga at World Congress Natural Medicines

On January 29, 30, 31st, 2016 Students and Faculty of the SomaVeda College of Natural Medicine  and the Thai Yoga Center of Brooksville Florida participated in the Third Annual World Congress on Natural Medicine and Tampa Physician’s Round Table at the Tampa Convention Center in downtown Tampa.

Thai Yoga at World Congress Natural Medicines was co-sponsored by the Sacred Medical Order of the Church of Hope (SMOCH), an international ecumenical monastic medical order and the Tampa Physicians Round Table.

Saturday the 30th. Dr. Anthony B. James, Director of Education and founder of SCNM: Thai Yoga Center gave a presentation on integration for Traditional Thai Massage, Thai Yoga, Thai Yoga Therapy,  Classical Ayurveda as a practical palliative therapy in Cancer treatment to the more than one hundred physicians from over 20 countries in attendance.

Dr. Anthony B. James with Dr. Tulio Simoncini and Staff Daniel Kram
Dr. Anthony B. James with Dr. Tulio Simoncini and Staff Daniel Kram

The title of the Monograph and Power point presented was “Indigenous, Traditional Medicinal Therapies as Cancer Complication Remediation and Palliative Support for Cachexia”.

The focus of Thai Yoga at The World Congress Natural Medicines was whether Indigenous and traditional, native medicine practices (Thai Yoga Therapy/ Ayurveda) and or evolving therapies derived from indigenous culture traditions make a positive contribution towards Cancer complication remediation and palliative care.  Dr. James cited international standards which Traditional Thai Massage and Thai Yoga Therapy clearly meet in respect to the practice guidelines on palliative therapies, procedures and positive outcomes. The scientific research support the clinical efficacy of Traditional Thai Massage (TTM) and Traditional Thai Physical Therapy (TTPT) also known as “Thai Yoga Therapy” in treating Cancer, Cancer symptoms, Cancer Palliation therapies for Cachexia and Pain are substantial. Over 40 published scientific clinical trials, research projects as well as anecdotal and traditional indications were cited in support.

Participants from over 20 countries presented on various topics relating to Cancer, Palliative Care, evolving strategies for prevention and treatment as well as the role of spirit and counseling in healing.

List of presenters

Bio’s and Lumenaries

Exibitors

For resources on how to learn SomaVeda® Thai Yoga visit ThaiYogaCenter.Com

 

The Effectiveness of Thai Exercise with Traditional Massage on the Pain, Walking Ability and QOL of Older People with Knee Osteoarthritis: A Randomized Controlled Trial in the Community

J Phys Ther Sci. 2014 Jan; 26(1): 139–144.
Published online 2014 Feb 6. doi:  10.1589/jpts.26.139
PMCID: PMC3927027

The Effectiveness of Thai Exercise with Traditional Massage on the Pain, Walking Ability and QOL of Older People with Knee Osteoarthritis: A Randomized Controlled Trial in the Community

Abstract

[Purpose] This study investigated the effectiveness of a class- and home-based exercise with massage between Thai traditional and standardized physical therapy (TPT and SPT) in older people with knee osteoarthritis (KOA). [Subjects and Methods] Thirty-one subjects with KOA (aged 50–85 years) in two selected villages were randomly assigned into the TPT or SPT programs. Seventeen TPT subjects received Thai exercise with traditional massage, and 14 SPT individuals performed strengthening exercise with Swedish massage.

Continue reading The Effectiveness of Thai Exercise with Traditional Massage on the Pain, Walking Ability and QOL of Older People with Knee Osteoarthritis: A Randomized Controlled Trial in the Community

A Randomized Controlled Trial on the Effectiveness of Court-Type Traditional Thai Massage versus Amitriptyline in Patients with Chronic Tension-Type Headache

Evid Based Complement Alternat Med. 2015; 2015: 930175.
Published online 2015 Sep 15. doi:  10.1155/2015/930175
PMCID: PMC4587431

A Randomized Controlled Trial on the Effectiveness of Court-Type Traditional Thai Massage versus Amitriptyline in Patients with Chronic Tension-Type Headache

1College of Public Health Sciences, Chulalongkorn University, Bangkok 10330, Thailand
2Research Center in Back, Neck, and Other Joint Pain and Human Performance, Faculty of Associated Medical Sciences, Khon Kaen University, Khon Kaen 40002, Thailand
3Bamnet Narong Hospital, Amphur Bamnet Narong, Chaiyaphum Province 36160, Thailand
4College of Allied Health Science, Suan Sunandha Rajabhat University, Bangkok 10300, Thailand
*Naowarat Kanchanakhan: ht.ca.aluhc@k.tarawoan and
*Wichai Eungpinichpong: moc.oohay@nueciw
Academic Editor: Arroyo-Morales Manuel

Abstract

This study aimed to evaluate the effectiveness of the court-type traditional Thai massage (CTTM) to treat patients with chronic tension-type headaches (CTTHs) comparing with amitriptyline taking. A randomized controlled trial was conducted. Sixty patients diagnosed with CTTH were equally divided into a treatment and a control group. The treatment group received a 45-minute course of CTTM twice per week lasting 4 weeks while the control group was prescribed 25 mg of amitriptyline once a day before bedtime lasting 4 weeks. Outcome measures were evaluated in week 2, week 4 and followed up in week 6 consisting of visual analog scale (VAS), tissue hardness, pressure pain threshold (PPT), and heart rate variability (HRV). The results demonstrated a significant decrease in VAS pain intensity for the CTTM group at different assessment time points while a significant difference occurred in within-group and between-group comparison (P < 0.05) for each evaluated measure. Moreover, the tissue hardness of the CTTM group was significantly lower than the control group at week 4 (P < 0.05). The PPT and HRV of the CTTM group were significantly increased (P < 0.05). CTTM could be an alternative therapy for treatment of patients with CTTHs.

Continue reading A Randomized Controlled Trial on the Effectiveness of Court-Type Traditional Thai Massage versus Amitriptyline in Patients with Chronic Tension-Type Headache

What is evidence-based about myofascial chains? A systematic review

Arch Phys Med Rehabil. 2015 Aug 14. pii: S0003-9993(15)01064-3. doi: 10.1016/j.apmr.2015.07.023. [Epub ahead of print]

What is evidence-based about myofascial chains? A systematic review.

Author information

  • 1Goethe University Frankfurt/Main, Department of Sports Medicine, Frankfurt am Main, Germany. Electronic address: wilke@sport.uni-frankfurt.de.
  • 2Goethe University Frankfurt/Main, Department of Sports Medicine, Frankfurt am Main, Germany.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To provide evidence for the existence of six myofascial meridians proposed by Myers (1997) based on anatomical dissection studies.

DATA SOURCES:

Relevant articles published between 1900 and December 2014 were searched in MEDLINE (Pubmed), ScienceDirect and Google Scholar.

STUDY SELECTION:

Peer-reviewed human anatomical dissection studies reporting morphological continuity between the muscular constituents of the examined meridians were included. If no study demonstrating a structural connection between two muscles was found, papers on general anatomy of the corresponding body region were targeted.

DATA EXTRACTION:

A continuity between two muscles was only documented if two independent investigators agreed that it was reported clearly. Also, two independent investigators rated methodological quality of included studies by means of a validated assessment tool (QUACS).

DATA SYNTHESIS:

The literature search identified 6589 articles. Of these, 62 papers met the inclusion criteria. The studies reviewed suggest strong evidence for the existence of three myofascial meridians: the superficial back line (all three transitions verified, based on 14 studies), the back functional line (all three transitions verified, 8 studies) and the front functional line (both transitions verified, 6 studies). Moderate to strong evidence is available for parts of the spiral line (five of nine verified transitions, 21 studies) and the lateral line (two of five verified transitions, 10 studies). No evidence exists for the superficial front line (no verified transition, 7 studies).

CONCLUSIONS:

The present systematic review suggests that most skeletal muscles of the human body are directly linked by connective tissue. Examining the functional relevance of these myofascial chains is the most urgent task of future research. Strain transmission along meridians would both open a new frontier for the understanding of referred pain and provide a rationale for the development of more holistic treatment approaches.

Copyright © 2015 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

PMID: 26281953[PubMed – as supplied by publisher]

PubMed® is the premiere database for scientific and medical research, and is a service of the US National Library of Medicine and National Institutes of Health. As NIH: NLM Licensed providers, we syndicate publicly available abstracts from PubMed that are relevant to our readers. For full text, subscription to PubMed® is required.

Thai Massage, and Thai Herbal Compress versus Oral Ibuprofen in Symptomatic Treatment of Osteoarthritis of the Knee: A Randomized Controlled Trial

Biomed Res Int. 2014; 2014: 490512.
Published online 2014 Sep 1. doi:  10.1155/2014/490512
PMCID: PMC4165631

Thai Massage, and Thai Herbal Compress versus Oral Ibuprofen in Symptomatic Treatment of Osteoarthritis of the Knee: A Randomized Controlled Trial

Abstract

The aim of this study was to verify the clinical responses to Thai massage (TM) and Thai herbal compression (THC) for treating osteoarthritis (OA) of the knee in comparison to oral ibuprofen. This study was a randomized, evaluator-blind, controlled trial. Sixty patients with OA of the knee were randomly assigned to receive either a one-hour session of TM or THC (three times weekly) or oral ibuprofen (three times daily). The duration of treatment was three weeks. The clinical assessments included visual analog scale assessing pain and stiffness, Lequesne’s functional index, time for climbing up ten steps, and physician’s and patient’s overall opinions on improvement. In a within-group comparison, each treatment modality caused a significant improvement of all variables determined for outcome assessments. In an among group comparison, all modalities provided nearly comparable clinical efficacy after a three-week symptomatic treatment of OA of the knee, in which a trend toward greatest improvement was likely to be found in THC group. In conclusion, TM and THC generally provided comparable clinical efficacy to oral ibuprofen after three weeks of treatment and could be considered as complementary and alternative treatments for OA of the knee.

Continue reading Thai Massage, and Thai Herbal Compress versus Oral Ibuprofen in Symptomatic Treatment of Osteoarthritis of the Knee: A Randomized Controlled Trial

The efficacy of traditional Thai massage for the treatment of chronic pain: A systematic review.

Complement Ther Clin Pract. 2015 Feb;21(1):26-32. doi: 10.1016/j.ctcp.2015.01.006. Epub 2015 Jan 31.

The efficacy of traditional Thai massage for the treatment of chronic pain: A systematic review.

Author information

  • 1Department of Physiology, Faculty of Medicine, Khon Kean University, Thailand.
  • 2Department of Rehabilitation Medicine, University of Washington, Seattle, USA.
  • 3Department of Physical Therapy, Faculty of Associated Medical Sciences, Khon Kaen University, Khon Kaen, Thailand.
  • 4Department of Physiology, Faculty of Medicine, Khon Kean University, Thailand. Electronic address: aparad@kku.ac.th.

Abstract

RATIONAL AND BACKGROUND:

Traditional Thai massage (TTM) is an alternative medicine treatment used for pain relief. The purpose of this paper is to provide a systematic review of the research about the effects of TTM on pain intensity and other important outcomes in individuals with chronic pain.

METHODS:

We performed a systematic review of the controlled trials of the effects of TTM, using the keywords “Traditional Thai massage” or “Thai massage” with the keyword “Chronic pain.”

RESULTS:

Six research articles met the inclusion criteria. All of the studies found a pre- to post-treatment pain reductions, varying from 25% to 80% and was also associated with improvements in disability, perceived muscle tension, flexibility and anxiety.

SUMMARY:

The TTM benefits of pain reduction appear to maintain for up to 15 weeks. Additional research is needed to identify the moderators, mediators and to determine the long-term benefits of TTM relative to control conditions.

Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

KEYWORDS:

Chronic pain; Thai massage; Traditional Thai massage

PMID:
25682523
[PubMed – in process]
PubMed® is the premiere database for scientific and medical research, and is a service of the US National Library of Medicine and National Institutes of Health. As NIH: NLM Licensed providers, we syndicate publicly available abstracts from PubMed that are relevant to our readers. For full text, subscription to PubMed® is required.