Category Archives: Thai Traditional Medicine

Thailand uses Traditional Thai Medicine Bringing Health Care to Elderly

Thailand uses Traditional Thai Medicine Bringing Health Care to Elderly

Wat Po Sen

Unlike many other countries, USA included Thailand values the contribution of the Indigenous Traditional Medicine (Thai Ayurveda/ Thai Yoga etc.) and has committed to ensuring the welfare of it’s aging population by utilizing it a health care resource. This is a big deal for any country to not only recognize it’s indigenous medicine heritage but to then incorporate it’s practice institutionally. No surprise for Thailand however, as the Thai government has been supporting traditional medicine for many years now.

Traditional Thai Medicine experts with various specialties from Yoga Therapy to Herbology work in teams alongside family physician, dentist, nurses, dental nurses, a pharmacist, a public health officer, a physiotherapist and a care-giver, and local residents working as a healthcare volunteers.

Read More: Meeting Age Head-on

Original Article: Courtesy Bangkok Post: ©Post Publishing PCL. All Rights reserved.

 

Ayurveda of Thailand Book now Available

Ayurveda of Thailand: Indigenous Traditional Thai Medicine and Yoga Therapy

 

PRESS RELEASE

New comprehensive textbook on the Ayurveda and Thai Yoga of Thailand!
Brooksville, FL, Release Date: 09/05/2016 –

Ayurveda of Thailand Book

Ayurveda of Thailand: Indigenous Traditional Thai Medicine and Thai Yoga are part of what makes Thailand, Thailand. The Royal ( Court or “Southern” Style) is the most classical form.

The book provides clear and concise instructions and details for the practice in a clinical setting. Over 160 photo and graphic illustrations present each traditional application in a logical format.

If your interested in Ayurveda, Thai Yoga or Traditional Thai Massage you must read this book!

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History of Thai Ayurveda and Thai Yoga in Thailand

History of Ayurveda and Thai Yoga in Thailand

Origins of Indigenous Traditional Thai Medicine and Massage

by

Thai Yoga reduces psychological stress

By Anthony B. James DNM(P), ND(T), MD(AM), DPHC(h.c.), PhD, DOM, RAC, SMOKH Academic Dean SomaVeda College of Natural Medicine and Thai Yoga Center (SCNM).

Indigenous, Traditional Thai Massage (Indigenous Thai Yoga Therapy), also called “Ryksaa Thang Nuad Phaen Boran Thai” or the “ancient Chirothesia (synonymous with Yoga Therapy Thai style) or hands-on healing” of Thailand, is born of a long tradition.[2] This unique system of indigenous, traditional, natural medicine and Yoga therapy finds it’s ancient roots first in the traditions of classical Ayurveda as far back as the 5th century BCE.  Subsequently the Vedic health and medical practices eventually became common practice in SE Asia, and Burma (Myanmar) and Thailand were heavily influenced by succeeding generations of Buddhist influence, philosophy and practice.  Some form of this traditional medicine has been taught and practiced in various locations for about 2500 years.

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Immediate Effects of Traditional Thai Massage on Psychological Stress as Indicated by Salivary Alpha-Amylase Levels in Healthy Persons.

Med Sci Monit Basic Res. 2015 Oct 5;21:216-21. doi: 10.12659/MSMBR.894343.

Immediate Effects of Traditional Thai Massage on Psychological Stress as Indicated by Salivary Alpha-Amylase Levels in Healthy Persons.

Abstract

BACKGROUND Stress can cause psychological and physiological changes. Many studies revealed that massage can decrease stress. However, traditional Thai massage has not been well researched in this regard. The purpose of this study was to investigate the immediate effects of traditional Thai massage (TTM) on salivary alpha-amylase levels (sAA), heart rate variability (HRV), autonomic nervous system (ANS) function, and plasma renin activity (PRA). MATERIAL AND METHODS Twenty-nine healthy participants were randomly allocated into either a traditional Thai massage (TTM) group or Control (C) group, after which they were switched to the other group with a 2-week wash-out period. Each of them was given a 10-minute mental arithmetic test to induce psychological stress before a 1-hour session of TTM or rest. RESULTS Within-groups comparison revealed that sAA was significantly decreased (p<0.05) in the TTM group but not in the C group. HRV and ANS function were significantly increased (p<0.05) and PRA was significantly decreased (p<0.05) in both groups. However, low frequency per high frequency ratio (LF/HF ratio) and ANS balance status were not changed. Only sAA was found to be significantly different between groups (p<0.05). CONCLUSIONS We conclude that both TTM and rest can reduce psychological stress, as indicated by decreased sAA levels, increased parasympathetic activity, decreased sympathetic activity, and decreased PRA. However, TTM may have a modest effect on stress reduction as indicated by a reduced sAA.

PMID:
26436433 [PubMed – in process] PMCID: PMC4599180 Free PMC Article

[PubMed]

PMID:
25682523 [PubMed – in process]
PubMed® is the premiere database for scientific and medical research, and is a service of the US National Library of Medicine and National Institutes of Health. As NIH: NLM Licensed providers, we syndicate publicly available abstracts from PubMed that are relevant to our readers. For full text, subscription to PubMed® is required.

Thai Yoga Therapy Role in Cancer Palliative Care Part 3

Thai Yoga Therapy Role in Cancer Palliation

By Anthony B. James DNM(P), ND(T), MD(AM), DPHC(h.c.), PhD, DOM, RAC, SMOKH Academic Dean SomaVeda College of Natural Medicine and Thai Yoga Center (SCNM).

General Benefits of Integrative Indigenous and Traditional Therapies Treatment adjuncts:

(Clinically researched i.e. validated in clinical trials and traditional anecdotal and benefits)

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Thai Yoga Therapy Role in Cancer Palliative Care Part 2

Thai Yoga Therapy Role in Cancer Palliation

By Anthony B. James DNM(P), ND(T), MD(AM), DPHC(h.c.), DOM, RAC, SMOKH Academic Dean SomaVeda College of Natural Medicine and Thai Yoga Center (SCNM).

Traditional/ Classical Thai Yoga/ Thai Massage contains the following areas of emphasis and therapeutic modalities:

1) Sophisticated and refined Manual/ Physio/ Body-centric Hands-on interventions:

Thai Yoga Therapy incorporates elements of energetic (unseen energy: magnetic, electric, sonic etc.) and prana assessment, mindfulness, gentle rocking, asana (positional/ postural), structural release, deep stretching, focused deep breathing or prana yama, chakra balancing (Pyscho-emotional, Somatic and proprioceptive emphasis), Prana Nadi or Sen line balancing (Lines of stress, trans-subcutaneous muscle channels, fascia and connective tissue planes and or lymphatic pathways) and rhythmic compression with either broad, deep, non specific tools such as palm, foot, elbow and knee to emphasize with either specific point ( area of high neurologic potential) or broad trans- subcutaneous muscular or fascial plane to create a singular healing experience.

Continue reading Thai Yoga Therapy Role in Cancer Palliative Care Part 2

Thai Yoga Therapy for Cancer

Thai Yoga Therapy Role in Cancer Palliation

By Anthony B. James DNM(P), ND(T), MD(AM), DPHC(h.c.), PhD, DOM, RAC, SMOKH Academic Dean SomaVeda College of Natural Medicine and Thai Yoga Center (SCNM).

Title: Indigenous, Traditional Medicinal Therapies as Cancer Complication Remediation and Palliative Support for Cachexia.

What is Cachexia?

Cachexia; from Greek κακός kakos “bad” and ἕξις hexis “condition”)[1] or wasting syndrome is loss of weight, muscle atrophy, fatigue, weakness, and significant loss of appetite in someone who is not actively trying to lose weight. Cachexia is also known or seen in patients with cancer, AIDS,[2] chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, multiple sclerosis, congestive heart failure, tuberculosis, familial amyloid polyneuropathy, malaria, mercury poisoning (acrodynia) and hormonal deficiency. It is a positive risk factor for death, meaning if the patient has cachexia, the chance of death from the underlying condition is increased dramatically. About 50% of all cancer patients suffer from cachexia.

Mechanism

The exact mechanism in which these diseases cause cachexia is poorly understood and may vary from one individual to another, but there is probably a role for inflammatory cytokines, such as tumor necrosis factor-alpha (which is also nicknamed ‘cachexin’ or ‘cachectin’), interferon gamma and interleukin 6, as well as the tumor-secreted proteolysis-inducing factor. Side effects of chemotherapy drug regimen and or radiation therapy may be causes. Categories of physical/ biological adverse and or side effects of conventional Cancer therapies: include Edema, Inflammation, Neuropathies and Neuralgias, Immune suppression. Severe, possibly long term chronic malnutrition may be a factor.

Management:

1) Can Indigenous and traditional, native medicine practices and or evolving therapies derived from Indigenous culture traditions make a positive contribution towards Cancer complication remediation and palliative care?

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The Effectiveness of Thai Exercise with Traditional Massage on the Pain, Walking Ability and QOL of Older People with Knee Osteoarthritis: A Randomized Controlled Trial in the Community

J Phys Ther Sci. 2014 Jan; 26(1): 139–144.
Published online 2014 Feb 6. doi:  10.1589/jpts.26.139
PMCID: PMC3927027

The Effectiveness of Thai Exercise with Traditional Massage on the Pain, Walking Ability and QOL of Older People with Knee Osteoarthritis: A Randomized Controlled Trial in the Community

Abstract

[Purpose] This study investigated the effectiveness of a class- and home-based exercise with massage between Thai traditional and standardized physical therapy (TPT and SPT) in older people with knee osteoarthritis (KOA). [Subjects and Methods] Thirty-one subjects with KOA (aged 50–85 years) in two selected villages were randomly assigned into the TPT or SPT programs. Seventeen TPT subjects received Thai exercise with traditional massage, and 14 SPT individuals performed strengthening exercise with Swedish massage.

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A Randomized Controlled Trial on the Effectiveness of Court-Type Traditional Thai Massage versus Amitriptyline in Patients with Chronic Tension-Type Headache

Evid Based Complement Alternat Med. 2015; 2015: 930175.
Published online 2015 Sep 15. doi:  10.1155/2015/930175
PMCID: PMC4587431

A Randomized Controlled Trial on the Effectiveness of Court-Type Traditional Thai Massage versus Amitriptyline in Patients with Chronic Tension-Type Headache

1College of Public Health Sciences, Chulalongkorn University, Bangkok 10330, Thailand
2Research Center in Back, Neck, and Other Joint Pain and Human Performance, Faculty of Associated Medical Sciences, Khon Kaen University, Khon Kaen 40002, Thailand
3Bamnet Narong Hospital, Amphur Bamnet Narong, Chaiyaphum Province 36160, Thailand
4College of Allied Health Science, Suan Sunandha Rajabhat University, Bangkok 10300, Thailand
*Naowarat Kanchanakhan: ht.ca.aluhc@k.tarawoan and
*Wichai Eungpinichpong: moc.oohay@nueciw
Academic Editor: Arroyo-Morales Manuel

Abstract

This study aimed to evaluate the effectiveness of the court-type traditional Thai massage (CTTM) to treat patients with chronic tension-type headaches (CTTHs) comparing with amitriptyline taking. A randomized controlled trial was conducted. Sixty patients diagnosed with CTTH were equally divided into a treatment and a control group. The treatment group received a 45-minute course of CTTM twice per week lasting 4 weeks while the control group was prescribed 25 mg of amitriptyline once a day before bedtime lasting 4 weeks. Outcome measures were evaluated in week 2, week 4 and followed up in week 6 consisting of visual analog scale (VAS), tissue hardness, pressure pain threshold (PPT), and heart rate variability (HRV). The results demonstrated a significant decrease in VAS pain intensity for the CTTM group at different assessment time points while a significant difference occurred in within-group and between-group comparison (P < 0.05) for each evaluated measure. Moreover, the tissue hardness of the CTTM group was significantly lower than the control group at week 4 (P < 0.05). The PPT and HRV of the CTTM group were significantly increased (P < 0.05). CTTM could be an alternative therapy for treatment of patients with CTTHs.

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Thai Traditional Medicine Sen Lines

Thai Traditional Medicine Sen Lines

Aachan, Prof. Dr. Anthony B. James

By Anthony B. James DNM(P), ND(T), MD(AM), DPHC(h.c.), DOM, RAC, SMOKH Academic Dean SomaVeda College of Natural Medicine and Thai Yoga Center (SCNM).

What are Thai Traditional Medicine Sen Lines?

Thai Traditional Medicine Sen Lines

Sen is the Thai word for line. It is the same concept as Prana Nadi used in Yogic terminology and the terms are interchangeable.  The Sanskrit word Nadi means stream or movement. Sip Sen are thought to be energetic pathways of the life giving breath in the body. These lines actually form the Matrix, Energetic or Prana Maya Kosha body. The oldest traditional yogic texts are reputed to make reference to the existence of 350,000 lines.

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